Ars Medica is a biannual literary journal, started in 2004, that explores the interface between the arts and healing, and examines what makes medicine an art. Ars Medica remains the only medical literary journal in Canada, and one of a handful of such journals in the world, in the rapidly developing international field of the humanities in healthcare.

Ars Medica allows a place for dialogue, meaning-making, and the representation of experiences of the body, health, wellness, and encounters with the medical system. Content includes narratives from patients and health care workers, medical history, fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. We also include sections on writing by and about children, and writing about international health. These are voices that are often silenced in healthcare.

Announcements

 

2015 Humanities Poetry and Prose Contest

 

Co-Sponsored by Ars Medica and CMAJ 

http://www.cmaj.ca/site/pdfs/humanities-poetry-and-prose-contest-2015.pdf

 
Posted: 2015-01-26 More...
 
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New @ Ars Medica

By Masood Hassan

These images were produced at the Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences in a learning activity to provide radiological technology students with an opportunity to develop a better understanding of X-ray attenuation and technical factors. This was a highly successful activity, which the students enjoyed.

Full text: PDF

By Claire Vallotton

I was surprised to find a birthday car from Curt in my inbox. It was especially strange because he had been dead for five months.
Full text: PDF

By Steven Gore

We feel his ivory teeth, we feel his head shake, we feel his warm drool and the rhythmic trot of his lean legs and padded feet. We smell gamey breath blowing from his wet nose and through his teeth, and we breathe musty dust rising from the trail ...
Full text: PDF

By William Orem

The two doctors were angry with each other, but you could only tell it by the way they lifted or dropped their brows over the white surgical masks and beneath the white surgical caps. They were both relatively tall men but the one holding an electric saw loosely in his slick gloved hand was younger than the other, and that was visible in his eyes as well. He had blue, bright, sympathetic eyes.
Full text: PDF
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We wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Munk School of Global Affairs, and Mount Sinai Hospital.

Canada Council for the Arts
Munk School of Global Affairs
Mount Sinai Hospital